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steve25805

WW2 Discussion thread

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WW2 is fascinating of course,but i also am interested in Napoleonic era,American Civil War,WW1,and most military history in general.I guess WW2 most interesting as we still use a lot of the innovations nowadays,in modern weapons..like spaced armour on tanks,Automatic rifles,camouflage uniforms,(the Waffen-SS were the first to routinely issue this)nuclear weapons still haunt us dont they?

I like relatively modern military history. World War 2 is my top interest in this field, but World War 1 is my second favourite such topic. Am reading a history of WW1 right now. Incidentally, two days from now is the centenary of the start of the epic Battle of Verdun in that war. My third favourite has to be the American Civil War, my fourth favourite the Spanish Civil War. My fifth is the Napoleonic and French Revolutionary Wars which I think of as one prolonged war.

Most 19th and 20th century wars interest me to a large degree to be honest.

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WW2 is fascinating of course,but i also am interested in Napoleonic era,American Civil War,WW1,and most military history in general.I guess WW2 most interesting as we still use a lot of the innovations nowadays,in modern weapons..like spaced armour on tanks,Automatic rifles,camouflage uniforms,(the Waffen-SS were the first to routinely issue this)nuclear weapons still haunt us dont they?

Yes, nuclear weapons still do haunt a lot of us . Though ever since I had watched Doctor Strange love / How I learned to LOVE the bomb.

I just started to noot worry any about it . As if where I live in the U.S. I would most likely die in a millisecond & not fel a damn thing at all. Should it ever happen ...........

I do find W.W.I , W.W. II , Korea . most interesting . As well as the civil war . As there were innovations that had come out of that conflict. like that of the gaitling gun & the first naval ship to have a revolving gun turret { Name that ship ? } which brought about the battleships of W.W.I * W.W.II

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Have you ever seen The Battle of Chernobyl?

It's a documentary on the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, Gorbachev was interviewed later, and he said it scared the shit out of him, wanted to completely wipe nuclear weapons from the Soviet Arsenal. He never wanted anyone to go through that ever again. If the little known second explosion had of happened, half of Europe including the UK would have been rendered uninhabitable.

Look it up, think it's on youtube now, scariest 90 min I've ever seen.

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I like relatively modern military history. World War 2 is my top interest in this field, but World War 1 is my second favourite such topic. Am reading a history of WW1 right now. Incidentally, two days from now is the centenary of the start of the epic Battle of Verdun in that war. My third favourite has to be the American Civil War, my fourth favourite the Spanish Civil War. My fifth is the Napoleonic and French Revolutionary Wars which I think of as one prolonged war.

Most 19th and 20th century wars interest me to a large degree to be honest.

Of course this year,the 100th anniversary of Verdun(21st Feb) and the Somme(1st July).First ever use of tanks,(by Britain,ahem..)September.

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Of course this year,the 100th anniversary of Verdun(21st Feb) and the Somme(1st July).First ever use of tanks,(by Britain,ahem..)September.

Yes. It is also the centenary year of the only large scale naval fleet action of the war - the Battle of Jutland (May 31st-June 1st)

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I thought I would start adding "On this date in WW2" posts to this thread. And this is re-edited because I got the months mixed up earlier. It is February, not frigging January!

On this date in 1941, German and British patrols met for the first time in North Africa.

On this date in 1942, the Japanese invaded Timor.

On this date in 1943, German Panzers broke through the American defences at the Kasserine Pass in Tunisia.

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Yes. It is also the centenary year of the only large scale naval fleet action of the war - the Battle of Jutland (May 31st-June 1st)

Steve 25805 ,

I have always been interested in the Naval battle of Jutland . As I know that the British prevent the German fleet from getting out into the Alantic , North Sea , in causing trouble in those areas .

Though how many British ships were sunk to that of the German fleet loses ?

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Steve 25805 ,

I have always been interested in the Naval battle of Jutland . As I know that the British prevent the German fleet from getting out into the Alantic , North Sea , in causing trouble in those areas .

Though how many British ships were sunk to that of the German fleet loses ?

The British lost six heavy cruisers or battlecruisers sunk, as well as eight destroyers.

The Germans lost one old, pre-dreadnought - and therefore obsolete - battleship and one battlecruiser, four light cruisers and five destroyers.

In terms of casualties, over 6000 British sailors lost their lives compared to just over 2500 Germans. So in terms of combat losses, the British came off worst, in large measure because their vessels' decks were less well armoured and thus more vulnerable to plunging German shot.

But it was the Germans who retreated, and never again dared venture out to challenge the British fleet. So the Allied blockade remained in place, and British naval supremacy was never seriously challenged thereafter.

In consequence of these facts, it has been said that for the British Jutland marked a tactical defeat for the Royal Navy but a strategic victory.

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The British lost six heavy cruisers or battlecruisers sunk, as well as eight destroyers.

The Germans lost one old, pre-dreadnought - and therefore obsolete - battleship and one battlecruiser, four light cruisers and five destroyers.

In terms of casualties, over 6000 British sailors lost their lives compared to just over 2500 Germans. So in terms of combat losses, the British came off worst, in large measure because their vessels' decks were less well armoured and thus more vulnerable to plunging German shot.

But it was the Germans who retreated, and never again dared venture out to challenge the British fleet. So the Allied blockade remained in place, and British naval supremacy was never seriously challenged thereafter.

In consequence of these facts, it has been said that for the British Jutland marked a tactical defeat for the Royal Navy but a strategic victory.

Steve,

Has there ever been any under water research / footage of what those ships look like now. Like a Documentary made of that famous naval battle ?

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On this date in 1940, General Falkenhorst was appointed to command the planned German invasion of Norway

On this date in 1945, US forces completed the liberation of the Bataan Peninsular on Luzon

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Not to my knowedge, Kevin. Sorry.

But I have found this.....

http://news.sky.com/story/1503175/sunken-wrecks-of-epic-wwi-naval-battle-revealed

Steve ,

Quite interesting that the ships being under water for so long now are still pretty much intact . Less battle damage . As well as damage resulting upon impact with the sea bed. I had though that ships as old as these were . might not be in any recognizable ahpe . As they were riveted & not welding at the time they all were built . Though the pictures do lend a glance of them . To be still intact .

A great important . As well as informative post .

So I do Thank You , in posting it .

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On this date in 1940, General Falkenhorst was appointed to command the planned German invasion of Norway

On this date in 1942, Arthur Harris became the leader of RAF Bomber Command

On this date in 1945, US forces completed the liberation of the Bataan Peninsular on Luzon

Construction began on the Auschwitz concentration camp too, guess no one needs to remember this ........

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Construction began on the Auschwitz concentration camp too, guess no one needs to remember this ........

I think we all need to remember what actually happened there, and how it came to happen, as a reminder of where hate leads.....

Hmmm, I could have fun with this ....... I'll need to find the book, I'll get back to you.

I wonder if it's the same book that's helping me out sometimes? :wink: :laugh:

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I think we all need to remember what actually happened there, and how it came to happen, as a reminder of where hate leads.....

I wonder if it's the same book that's helping me out sometimes? :wink: :laugh:

A saying that reminds me of what total evil the Nazi regime was . is this '' Least We Forget , It will happen Again , If We are Not Vigilant "

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I think we all need to remember what actually happened there, and how it came to happen, as a reminder of where hate leads.....

I wonder if it's the same book that's helping me out sometimes? :wink: :laugh:

The Almanac of World War II, 1982. Think I picked it up at a rummage sale in Dumphries, name on the inside is a Mr Colin Murphy.

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The Almanac of World War II, 1982. Think I picked it up at a rummage sale in Dumphries, name on the inside is a Mr Colin Murphy.

Oh OK. Mine is World War 2 Day by Day, 1989

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On February 22nd in 1940, Soviet forces began to occupy the Finnish islands in the Gulf of Finland

In 1942, Arthur Harris became the leader of RAF Bomber Command

In 1943, the Germans launched a counter-attack on the eastern front, aiming to retake Kharkov

In 1945, British forces landed on Kangaw Island off the west coast of Burma

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On February 22nd in 1940, Soviet forces began to occupy the Finnish islands in the Gulf of Finland

In 1942, Arthur Harris became the leader of RAF Bomber Command

In 1943, the Germans launched a counter-attack on the eastern front, aiming to retake Kharkov

In 1945, British forces landed on Kangaw Island off the west coast of Burma

In 1942, General MacArthur was ordered to leave the Philipines and set up base in Australia.

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1942 The Battle Of Midway Island in the Pacific ocean . Was the turning point in the war between Japan and America .

Where the Japanese lost 4 major carriers and a heavy cruiser . To that of America losing one carrier and a destroyer . In that Naval battle that took place on June 4 - 6 1942

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On this day 2 - 23 - 1945 , The U.S. Flag was raised on Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima . Though the island was not completely secured . until April 1945 . Which was the most bloodest battle so far in the Pacific theater .

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On this day 2 - 23 - 1945 , The U.S. Flag was raised on Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima . Though the island was not completely secured . until April 1945 . Which was the most bloodest battle so far in the Pacific theater .

Also on February 23rd 1945, Soviet forces captured Poznan in western Poland. And in the Arctic a German JU88 bomber sunk a British merchant ship, the last merchant ship to be sunk by German aircraft in World War 2.

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Steve , Have you ever researched about the sinking of the H.M.S. Edinburgh ?

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